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This place on East Beach brings back warm memories. One night, bioluminescent dinoflagellates washed up there, the pressure of our footsteps caused them to emanate light as my sister and I laughed and ran all over the sand. In college, my friends and I packed into my parents' minivan and drove there to spend New Year's Eve huddling together and shivering next to a fire. During grad school, I would often go there alone to walk, to vent, to relax, to celebrate, to mourn. It's where I would go to yell at the waves. It's where I first began thinking about how health is a much broader concept than that which can be confined within hospitals or other clinical spaces. It's where I first began thinking about how the environments we inhabit affect our mental spaces. The day I saw these wildflowers waving in the wind, I remember admiring their beauty and liveliness, even while feeling a sense of sadness for their transience and finitude... This place is a part of me. This place is my home on that strange, little isle called Galveston.

ABOUT HER SELECTED PHOTO: This place on East Beach brings back warm memories. One night, bioluminescent dinoflagellates washed up there, the pressure of our footsteps caused them to emanate light as my sister and I laughed and ran all over the sand. In college, my friends and I packed into my parents’ minivan and drove there to spend New Year’s Eve huddling together and shivering next to a fire. During grad school, I would often go there alone to walk, to vent, to relax, to celebrate, to mourn. It’s where I would go to yell at the waves. It’s where I first began thinking about how health is a much broader concept than that which can be confined within hospitals or other clinical spaces. It’s where I first began thinking about how the environments we inhabit affect our mental spaces. The day I saw these wildflowers waving in the wind, I remember admiring their beauty and liveliness, even while feeling a sense of sadness for their transience and finitude… This place is a part of me. This place is my home on that strange, little isle called Galveston. Click here to view all of her photos.

Erica Fletcher is a former resident of Galveston’s East End, where she lived for several years while completing a Ph.D. in Medical Humanities at The University of Texas Medical Branch. She has been roaming the island since she was a baby; and many of her childhood memories include playing at the Seawall, driving past the giant oaks on Broadway, riding the trolley cars, performing at Galveston Opera House, and busking on the Strand. She is now a Visiting Scholar at The University of Houston’s Honors College and serves as Program Director for Honors in Community Health, a service-learning organization for undergraduate students. She also teaches introductory courses in cultural anthropology and medical humanities.

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